65 Sleep Hacks That Actually Work: Backed by Science (Part 3)

October 27, 2021

65 Sleep Hacks That Actually Work: Backed by Science (Part 3)

Sleep Hacks for College Students

18. Take a power nap: Long nights studying and lack of a consistent sleep schedule can leave you groggy during the day. Getting a short power nap during the day is proven to enhance learning and improve memory. It might be tempting to take a longer nap but this can backfire and leave you feeling groggy and worse than before. To get the most out of your power naps, keep them 15-20 minutes long.

19. No homework in bed: For many students living in cramped apartments and dorms, the only location for doing homework is in bed. When you do your homework in bed, your brain begins to equate the bedroom with school and homework which can lead to sleep anxiety and trouble falling asleep. Instead of writing your paper in bed, go to the library or work at a desk or dining room table.

20. Stream responsibly: We all want to catch up on the latest true crime doc, catch the latest thriller, or watch the latest episode of our favorite shows. It’s best to avoid watching intense or scary TV shows and movies before bed. Even if you’re a seasoned horror fan or true crime aficionado, intense shows and movies can impact your sleep by raising both your heart rate and adrenaline levels. Streaming before bed? Stick with a favorite sitcom.

21. Invest in blackout curtains: If you're up too late studying or coming home from a night out with friends, it can be tempting to hit up a drive thru or grab a not-so-healthy snacks. Eating full meals, greasy food, spicy food, or anything too sweet before going to bed can disrupt your sleep-not to mention cause digestive issues.

22. Skip the late night munchies: If you're up too late studying or coming home from a night out with friends, it can be tempting to hit up a drive thru or grab a not-so-healthy snack. Eating full meals, greasy food, spicy food, or anything too sweet before going to bed can disrupt your sleep-not to mention cause digestive issues.

23. Reward yourself for waking up: Most of us aren’t morning people and can struggle to wake up. Make your daily wake-up a treat by rewarding yourself with something you enjoy like a cup of coffee, your favorite breakfast, or reading before you start your day. Having something to look forward to every morning will make getting up in the morning easier

24. Don’t give into social pressures: FOMO (fear of missing out) is a powerful force, especially for college students. Instead of sleeping, it can be tempting to catch up with friends or stay up to date on the latest news. Staying up late texting, scrolling through apps, or consuming distressing news won’t help you get the sleep you need; you can catch up on your notifications in the morning.

25. Don’t hit the snooze button: Waking up is hard enough-hitting snooze only makes it worse. You might think the extra 10 minutes of shut eye will help, but it’s doing more harm than good. Snoozing will cause your body's internal clock to be thrown off, making you feel groggy all day because your sleep is disrupted in the middle of the sleep cycle. Use a sleep app like Sleep Cycle to track your sleep and wake you up in the lightest stage of sleep so you aren’t groggy for the rest of the day.

26. Invest in some earplugs: Student life can be loud. From noisy roommates, to parties across the way, or just background noise, all of these disturbances can make it difficult to fall and remain asleep. Get some earplugs to help block out noise and to get some sleep.

27. Skip the all-nighters: With endless homework assignments, work, and trying to maintain a social life, being a college student can leave little room for free time. Often, students will wait until the last minute to complete assignments or study causing them to pull an all-nighter. Staying up all night and getting no sleep impedes learning, disrupts the sleep cycle, and increases the likelihood of getting sick.

28. Power down your electronics: It can be hard to put your phone down at any time, let alone before bed. Blue light from phones and other electronics suppresses melatonin and keeps you awake. According to experts, electronics should be put away at least 30 minutes before bed. Hide your phone under the mattress, across the floor, or in another room, and turn off all notifications.

29. Consider your future health: When we’re young we often don’t consider our future health. The habits we pick up can last a lifetime. By starting healthy habits like exercise, eating fruits and vegetables, staying properly hydrated, and getting the proper amount of sleep when you’re young you are more likely to continue them throughout the rest of your life. Also, you’ll get a jump start on the path to lifelong good health.